By: Maureen Hussey, RO, RCLP
Registrar

This article appeared in issue 76 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

For years various people have tried to tie the request for an increase in scope of practice with deregulation. This threat has been used for the last ten years to no end. There is an international trend towards a decrease in self regulation. We fear that way of doing things, perhaps because we do not understand how we can fit into it. The struggle to maintain our system is a careful balance between public safety and consumers’ choice. Neither of these pieces has anything to do with scope of practice.

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By: Field Law’s Professional Regulatory Group

This article appeared in issue 76 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

What is the Applicable Standard of Proof in Professional Discipline Hearings?

Prior to 2008, there was some disagreement in the law regarding what standard or degree of proof should be applied to allegations of unprofessional conduct where the conduct in issue could also constitute criminal behavior. Although Alberta courts have consistently held that there is only one standard of proof in professional discipline proceedings, namely balance of probabilities, courts in some other jurisdictions determined that there are “degrees of probability” within the civil standard, depending on the subject matter, and that a higher degree of probability would be required in cases where the alleged conduct was serious in nature.

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This article appeared in issue 76 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

 

One of the opportunities that we have as a profession and individually as a professional is to improve our service of the public with the responsibility to our Code of Ethics.

#3.  I shall render my services to all my customers/patients with equal diligence, respect and without discrimination.

I would like to cite an example to you all today:

A call was made to the AOA regarding difficulty a lady was having purchasing spectacles.  It was apparent that this lady had been to an optical, placed a pair of frames aside, and asked the optician to hold them for her until she had her eyes examined.  The patient returned to the optical a month later and was prepared to order the spectacles.  The frames had been sold and could not be re-ordered. The patient then chose to attend another optical and order spectacles… She attempted this, however, according to Blue Cross, the patient was not eligible for eyeglasses until 2012.

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This article appeared in issue 74 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

A patient arrives at your dispensing station requesting new eyeglasses, you spend considerable time discussing the needs of the client and eventually you determine the type of frames, lenses, index of refraction, tint, material and a number of other variables. The lenses are made to prescription obtained from the physician or optometrist and delivered to the patient. Some weeks later the patient returns to your office either with a note from an optometrist or physician instructing you to make changes to the lenses you designed.

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By: Field Law’s Professional Regulatory Group

This article appeared in issue 74 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

Introduction:

In 2008 the Alberta legislature passed the Health Professions Amendment Act, 2008 that, in part, created a power of inspection for the health profession regulatory colleges. The legislation has not been proclaimed so is not yet in force. As well, Government needs to pass a regulation before the inspection power can be “operationalized.”

By: Judy Hierlihy, Public Member

This article appeared in issue 74 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

It is with sincere respect for the significant accomplishments of the Council of the Alberta Opticians Association (AOA) over the past year that I submit the following report on my activities as a Public Member.   I have felt privileged and honoured to work with such a dynamic group of professionals who are truly committed to creating a standard of excellence for optician services within the province of Alberta.

By: Leslie Rose

This article appeared in issue 74 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

Humour is a communication skill. It is invaluable for those who want to improve teamwork and morale. When we add humour to our conversations, we become more confident, more interesting and more resourceful. We can use puns, teasing, cartoons and telling jokes to build interest in what we are saying. When we listen to funny people and when we watch sitcoms, we learn that humour often involves knowing what others expect to hear and giving it a twist. Adding humour throughout the day reminds all of us not to become stressed.

By: F. Charles Gulley, DD, F.C.A.D.

 

This article appeared in issue 73 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

 

Consumer complaints are an unfortunate part of providing services to the public; whether via a retail/commercial business or in providing professional health services.

Dealing with patient complaints, which are brought directly to you by the patient, are part of running a practice and a business, and they can usually be addressed with appropriate discussion and correctional procedures (if necessary).

By: Charlotte Kessler, President, AOA/COA

This article appeared in issue 73 of the Eighth Line Newsletter, and has been edited for easier viewing on the web. Some of the information in this article may be out of date. Refer to our current static website pages for correct information.

Have any of you ever wondered what the Board of Directors is and what it is they do?  How about the history and/or current status of the AOA/COA and its projects and directives?  I know that I asked myself these questions before I joined the board and so I am hoping to offer to those that are interested, a synopsis of where we have been, where we are and where we are going.